Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 51 to 57 of 57

Thread: Driving/Firing.

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    11
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I too am enjoying the chats, and yes, we are on the same side but we’re coming from different directions, I much prefer a definitive law, ie “entirely” when you use “part of” in a sports law it becomes, dare I say it, “a grey area”, that’s why I maintain that the present law is a fudge and want the old wording back in place. And lets hope that a rule change is in the offing, but, like you, I won’t hold my breath, since when did the hierarchy listen to the people?

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    11
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    LAW XI In federation laws, The player at the moment of delivering the jack or his bowl shall have one foot entirely within the confines of the mat; the foot may be either in contact with, or over, the mat. Failure to observe this law constitutes "foot-faulting".
    and the umpires do enforce it, this used to be the
    wording for eba also until it was changed. Please note the word "entirely"

  3. #53
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    1,568
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 56/0
    Given: 11/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fed4ever View Post
    LAW XI In federation laws, The player at the moment of delivering the jack or his bowl shall have one foot entirely within the confines of the mat; the foot may be either in contact with, or over, the mat. Failure to observe this law constitutes "foot-faulting".
    and the umpires do enforce it, this used to be the
    wording for eba also until it was changed. Please note the word "entirely"
    If you think the WB law is a fudge then this is as well. It is nigh on impossible for an umpire to tell that the foot is entirely within the confines of the mat at the point of delivery. If an umpire stands at the rear, he can only attest to the sides of the mat, similarly if he stands at the side he can only attest to front/back. I can try to judge it but there is no physical way I can tell about the foots relative position in relation to 4 planes if it is borderline.

    By borderline I mean that if the player is leaning forward the heel might be breaking the plane but the rest of the foot is within it (possibly by millimetres).

    The only 100% certain way would be to state that the foot (or part) must be in contact with the mat at the point of delivery - that can be easily seen and checked. If there is "daylight" between the foot and the mat either vertically or horizontally then it would be a fault.
    Commonwealth Games Technical Official - Glasgow 2014 - now ExUmpire and non ITO.

    Please note any opinions stated now that I no longer have any official status are my own.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    1,304
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 21/1
    Given: 1/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fed4ever View Post
    LAW XI In federation laws, The player at the moment of delivering the jack or his bowl shall have one foot entirely within the confines of the mat; the foot may be either in contact with, or over, the mat. Failure to observe this law constitutes "foot-faulting".
    and the umpires do enforce it, this used to be the
    wording for eba also until it was changed. Please note the word "entirely"
    I agree with you entirely was a better law, as for umpires enforcing it,i cannot agree.The federation finals at Skegness every year are a good example,most of th umpires were not actually very near to the green,but stnding in the spectators,and on one occasion i observed had to be helped toget onthe green to do a measure,of course the other factor is, most of the foot fault issues occur around firing which happens less in federation bowls.It does not matter what ws say here,the Problem willonly be resolved with the controlling body taking more control, and advising the relevant officials,that the law needs enforcing. Sorry i must stop to take another breath
    No Grey Areas

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    11
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Entirely means exactly that, put your big toenail on the green and you will be done for foot-faulting. Any bowler who puts his foot on the white border to start with is immediately suspect and it does say “the foot may be either in contact with, or over, the mat”. So an umpire in tennis sitting in his chair can call a foot-fault on a server or a line fault when the ball is whizzing past at 70mph, a linesman in football can pick out an off-side at 10mph and an umpire at bowls can’t pick up a foot-fault at just over walking pace. At the time of delivery 90% of bowlers do have their toe on the mat and as the leg swings up it is still within the confines of the mat. Surely experience will tell you when a foot–fault occurs. The best solution is “if in doubt, call it out”
    And Skegness, I was speaking to an umpire there a couple of years ago and he said if he stands on the bank he gets crap from the spectators, stands in the walkway he gets crap from the people trying to get past, then if he’s wanted on the green he has to climb over the seats, says he can’t win wherever he is.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    suffolk
    Posts
    1,304
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 21/1
    Given: 1/0

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I know for a fact anumpire sitting in a chair is in no position tocall a foot fault, nor would he,with regard to skegness youe excuses for the umpires is down to a complete lack of organisation by the controlling body,
    No Grey Areas

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Under a rock most days
    Posts
    8,266
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 81/45
    Given: 72/7

    Default


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    At the risk of repeating myself, first call by any Umpire is a "Warning" so if any players are warned will they Re-Offend?

    So why don't more Umpires take up the warning process, they are not penalising the player, but once warned the player is going to think about and address their delivery fault so that it does not happen again, as to this argument of proof that a player is committing the offence, does a linesman have to prove a player foot faulted in tennis if they call them? Does an Umpire in Cricket have to prove a player bowled a "No Ball" he called, do officials in sporting events of all kinds have to prove contestants faulted their calls? in most cases "The Umpires decision is and was final" so why are Bowls Umpires so bloody whimpish about being seen to act on enforcement, is it that they crawl back into their shells if some were to challenge them on their decision?

    If I make a call and someone challenges my call I quickly tell them I am the Umpire and to go away, biggest trouble I see is so many of our Umpires rub shoulders with the players all the time and would never act on one of their "Mates"
    If anyone can save Bowls in England, this Man Can http://www.dailymail.co.uk/video/foo...owls-team.html .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •