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Thread: Coaching autistic

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    Default Coaching autistic


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    Next week i have taken on to start coahing a 17 year old girl who is Autistic and selective mute. So would love to receive advice from anyone with experience of working in that environment ,(her Mother is coming too)I understand eye contact is not good so to me that sounds difficult,i have worked with physical disability, but this is something different, any help appreciated ,thanks JH
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    Hi John, I do have quite a lot of experience of working autistic and also aspergic kids. I think it a little difficult to advise though, as each person will have different behaviours and needs according to where they are on the spectrum. I think the key thing for you to focus on is the fact that the mum is coming. I would make a point of discussing this with the mum before-hand. She should be best placed to advise you.

    I've worked with people that cannot communicate with you at all. It feels like you are just saying things out loud with no feedback at all. I've also worked with people who might be seen as quite mildly autistic - and there has been quite a lot of engagement and communication. Honestly, there is no real advice to give - except speak with the mum before-hand and also don't expect things to happen as you might think they should, or as you might explain them. They will dictate how the session goes, and your job is to listen, try to empathise/understand and see if you can assist in something positive developing. Also, you are good to be aware of eye contact - also body space, being aware of distractions, no loud, unexpected noises etc. Sorry not to be of more help, but that's hopefully of some benefit.

    Have fun. It can be very enjoyable working with people on the autistic spectrum

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    Quote Originally Posted by happymrjames View Post
    Hi John, I do have quite a lot of experience of working autistic and also aspergic kids. I think it a little difficult to advise though, as each person will have different behaviours and needs according to where they are on the spectrum. I think the key thing for you to focus on is the fact that the mum is coming. I would make a point of discussing this with the mum before-hand. She should be best placed to advise you.

    I've worked with people that cannot communicate with you at all. It feels like you are just saying things out loud with no feedback at all. I've also worked with people who might be seen as quite mildly autistic - and there has been quite a lot of engagement and communication. Honestly, there is no real advice to give - except speak with the mum before-hand and also don't expect things to happen as you might think they should, or as you might explain them. They will dictate how the session goes, and your job is to listen, try to empathise/understand and see if you can assist in something positive developing. Also, you are good to be aware of eye contact - also body space, being aware of distractions, no loud, unexpected noises etc. Sorry not to be of more help, but that's hopefully of some benefit.

    Have fun. It can be very enjoyable working with people on the autistic spectrum
    Thanks very much for your advice,I think in 20 years of coaching, this is my biggest challenge.I will keep you informed, thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by happymrjames View Post
    Hi John, I do have quite a lot of experience of working autistic and also aspergic kids. I think it a little difficult to advise though, as each person will have different behaviours and needs according to where they are on the spectrum. I think the key thing for you to focus on is the fact that the mum is coming. I would make a point of discussing this with the mum before-hand. She should be best placed to advise you.

    I've worked with people that cannot communicate with you at all. It feels like you are just saying things out loud with no feedback at all. I've also worked with people who might be seen as quite mildly autistic - and there has been quite a lot of engagement and communication. Honestly, there is no real advice to give - except speak with the mum before-hand and also don't expect things to happen as you might think they should, or as you might explain them. They will dictate how the session goes, and your job is to listen, try to empathise/understand and see if you can assist in something positive developing. Also, you are good to be aware of eye contact - also body space, being aware of distractions, no loud, unexpected noises etc. Sorry not to be of more help, but that's hopefully of some benefit.

    Have fun. It can be very enjoyable working with people on the autistic spectrum

    I agree with this have a good talk with the mum to see what works and what doesn't. Over the years I've known couple of autistic kids (one was mild and the other really severe). I learnt you have to be:

    - VERY Patient.
    - Keep things simple like no big words and no in-depth instructions to begin with.
    - Some like a structure to what they are doing and learning. So plan out what you want to do on paper (with pretty colours too) and present it to the girl and show her what you want to do and plan to do.
    - Keep things short to begin with, dont draw things out sorta thing.

    This is what I've personally learned from being around autistic kids. I was friends with one for a few good years, before he had an outburst, threatened to kill me and then blocked me form all social media and I've never seen him since then. But yeah, chat with the mum and see what works first and go from there. Good luck and let us know how you get on!
    You can always out-bowl your bad luck in every game!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Falky View Post
    I agree with this have a good talk with the mum to see what works and what doesn't. Over the years I've known couple of autistic kids (one was mild and the other really severe). I learnt you have to be:

    - VERY Patient.
    - Keep things simple like no big words and no in-depth instructions to begin with.
    - Some like a structure to what they are doing and learning. So plan out what you want to do on paper (with pretty colours too) and present it to the girl and show her what you want to do and plan to do.
    - Keep things short to begin with, dont draw things out sorta thing.

    This is what I've personally learned from being around autistic kids. I was friends with one for a few good years, before he had an outburst, threatened to kill me and then blocked me form all social media and I've never seen him since then. But yeah, chat with the mum and see what works first and go from there. Good luck and let us know how you get on!
    Many thanks Falky really appreciated.
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    Thanks Guys,the session went quite well,we are started by rolling jacks,and at one stage she wanted to bowl with one in each hand,she realised it was easier with just one, she only spoke twice in the hour, but they were positive remarks,with the bowls she was much better than i expected at bowling about 25metres,her Mum said she enjoyed it,an hour was plenty,and she did smile when they left,coming back next week,my problem really is if she wants to continue after the 4 weeks free coaching, and free rink fees,who will she play with, she is at college during the week, ladies leagues are afternoons,weekends is possible but no one of her age group(17) she could play with her Mum but i do not think that is the object, her Mum looked to have a good delivery as well.anyway thanks once again any more ideas or advice very welcome
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